Posted by on July 11, 2017 5:26 am
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Categories: Bay Area + California

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(BANT) – Vallejo police Monday said an internal investigation found no evidence that a police officer used a racial slur against a carjacking suspect during a traffic stop Saturday afternoon. Officials have also asked San Francisco-based KPIX CBS 5 news to stop running a story reporting that the slur was used.

Police said on Sunday that a resident who recorded the traffic stop on a mobile phone claimed a Vallejo police officer used the “N-word” during an initial contact with the suspect of a carjacking that had occurred in a different jurisdiction.

After the allegations, police said Chief Andrew Bidou ordered an immediate investigation of the incident, and the officer had been identified and placed on leave pending the investigation.

“Interviews were conducted of the occupants of the vehicle who were both Hispanic,” police said in a news release.

“The driver of the vehicle denied that the officer used any racial slurs and specifically denied that the officer used the ‘N-word,'” police said.

“The passenger of the vehicle, David Plancarte, was arrested in connection with an armed carjacking and refused to give a statement,” police said.

Vallejo police were eventually able to obtain an original copy of the video from the resident who made the recording, and upon playing the recording, the officer can be heard clearly saying ‘Hey David’ where the ‘N-word’ was thought to have been heard, according to police.

“The internal affairs investigation continues regarding the officer’s use of profanity. The Vallejo Police Department is fully confident that no racial slur was used,” Vallejo police said.

Vallejo Police released this request on their Facebook page asking KPIX 5 to stop reporting that the N-word was used during the traffic stop:

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While the investigation continues, however, the officer who was initially placed on leave is scheduled to return to work this week, according to Lieutenant Jeff Bassett.

You can watch the video here (warning, strong language):